Gerald G. Griffin and ‘The Gods of Winter’

Best-Selling, Multi-Published author, Gerald G. Griffin

Author Biography: Gerald G. Griffin was born in Flint, Michigan, and graduated from high school there as class Valedictorian. After obtaining his BBA at a local college, he attended graduate school at Michigan State University, receiving his MA and PhD in psychology, by this time married, with two sons. Following graduation, he accepted a position with a psychologist in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia. One year later Gerald set up his own private practice in Atlanta as a consulting psychologist, and his practice eventually grew to the point of necessitating two fully staffed offices at different sites, with a smaller one in his home. During this professional growth, Gerald’s social life also grew, including the fraternity of many friends and the fellowship of a country club. Through all of this, Gerald managed to write three published novels. While in practice in Atlanta, Gerald was listed in Marquis WHO’S WHO in the South and Southwest, Personalities of America and Notable Americans. Nancy Cline, a member of MENSA, said in review of Gerald’s writings: “In this age, yes, there’s a nobility of spirit and the courage to preserve and to protect that nobility. In the field of fiction we have men of great stature. To that list add the name of Gerald G. Griffin.”

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Nurture Book Tour stop – ‘The Consul’s Daughter’ by Mark Knowles

Today is the final day of Mark’s Nurture Book Tour and I was curious about what it takes to write a crimer thriller based on actual historical facts. The question that I asked him was, What are the ethics of writing about historical figures?. His answer is below:

This is an interesting question because, if we’re honest, I’m not sure many writers observe any ethics when writing about this period: it’s just too remote. I think one of the dangers of this for historical fiction is creating pantomime style, monochrome villains, or characters that appear too modern in their outlook. People in Ancient Italy and Greece lived by a different moral code and there’s very little point judging them by our own. I think we at least owe it to these figures to make them as rounded as possible in the context of their time. This doesn’t mean they can’t be entertaining though.

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Book Spotlight – And Then I Am Gone by Mathias B. Freese

And Then I Am Gone: A Walk with Thoreau

by Mathias B. Freese

And Then I Am Gone: A Walk with Thoreau tells the story of a New York City man who becomes an Alabama man. Despite his radical migration to simpler living and a late-life marriage to a saint of sorts, his persistent pet anxieties and unanswerable questions follow him. Mathias Freese wants his retreat from the societal “it” to be a brave safari for the self rather than cowardly avoidance, so who better to guide him but Henry David Thoreau, the self-aware philosopher who retreated to Walden Pond “to live deliberately” and cease “the hurry and waste of life”? In this memoir, Freese wishes to share how and why he came to Harvest, Alabama (both literally and figuratively), to impart his existential impressions and concerns, and to leave his mark before he is gone.

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